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It's your community too

I know some see it as art, but what's being done in and around Cold Lake is far from art. Sure, graffiti can be made beautifully, like some of the murals in downtown Edmonton or other city centres.
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I know some see it as art, but what's being done in and around Cold Lake is far from art. 

Sure, graffiti can be made beautifully, like some of the murals in downtown Edmonton or other city centres. But those that are doing it locally really aren't putting their heart into their work.

That is, unless their version of artistic expression is spray painting profanities across the side of a school bus. If so, then please, explain. 

Not only did the vandal cause an extensive amount of damage to a facility that is used by families across the region, but they caused hours of back-breaking work for city staff.

I am sure whoever it was chuckled to themselves as they thought of the reaction they would get out of the community in the morning. 

Well, despite the fact that people are angry, they're also disappointed. This is a space where their children go to play soccer, mess around at the skate park, and hit the ball diamond. 

The high school was even targeted. 

My question to the vandal is why?

If you need some art supplies, I am pretty sure there are a few places in town that can spare some, especially if it means keeping the facilities in the community clean and profanity free. 

But, the issue of vandalism and just outright disrespect go far beyond city limits. 

Vandalism is everywhere, but what's become even more disturbing, is the drugs and drug paraphernalia being found by children. 

These kids aren't hanging out in deep dark corners of the community, they're enjoying the park or walking home from school just like any other day.

We have all seen the Facebook posts with a photo of what is clearly drug paraphernalia, or to the best of the poster's knowledge, actual drugs.

On behalf of all parents from across the Lakeland, please, stop destroying our community buildings and stop leaving dangerous items in places where kids can find them. 

All we want is a safe place for our children to play, somewhere they won't read the f-bomb on the side of the slide or find a bag of drugs in the bush.

I mean really, it's your community too. 

Meagan MacEachern, Bonnyville Nouvelle